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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
because of scheduling, the need to deal with the debt ceiling, the need to deal with the looming she quester and the house republicans' concern that if they do anything on tax reform, that they may leave themselves up to the senate not to take action, and, therefore, they've taken an unpopular vote for no reason. why are you optimistic on tax reform? >> first of all, we have to resolve this debt can crisis in terms of -- this debt crisis in terms of sequestration and in terms of the full faith and credit of the u.s. in the next six weeks. we aren't going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that i think cannot basically be moved for what we need to do. and so that will leave us adequate time to tackle the longerrer-range problems -- the longer-range problems. we're not going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. but we need to, essentially, deal with the sequester, essentially find a balanced approach that's going to raise a trillion dollars or close to it. and so that's why i have some optimism, because we need to face up to the next six we
between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone acknowledges, we have to do something. we have to act. i hope we're all agreed that there's a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the ones we witnessed in newton 34 days ago, cannot continue to be tolerated. that tragedy in all my yea
ceiling by a few months but still has major budget cuts to deal with this spring. do you see his relationship with republicans improving at all as they try to fix this crisis? >> it is going to be a real confrontation. the republicans did blink. that's exactly right, bianna, and said they don't want this over the debt limit that was supposed to hit in february and extend it, as he said, probably until april. the president will sign that which gives them a space to try to come up again with some kind of big budget deal before those across-the-board budget cuts hit in march, and the government is set to shut down at the end of march. there is no question that these big fiscal issues, taxes and spending are going to define the first quarter of the president's second term. >> george, talk about this term, the second term curse. we -- reagan had iran-contra. nixon, of course, had watergate. clinton had monica lewinsky. but why is it that they tend to go sour. >> lyndon johnson didn't even make it to the second term. he had to resign because of vietnam. ever since roosevelt and the ame
that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government does not pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in the deal. it went part of the way, as you mentioned. but it leaves a number of issues still on the table and traditional negotiations are looming. would you characterize that as an additional cliff that is facing us? or do you think it is not as concerning as it was when you raised the term initially? >> as i said, the fiscal cliff, if allowed to take place, would have probably created a recession this year. a good bit of that has been addressed. nevertheless, we still have a fairly restrictive set of fiscal policies now. it is estimated that federal fiscal policy will contract from real gdp growth something on the order of 1% to 1.5% this year, a significant drag on the economy. we have quite a bit to do to address our long-term still beneatsustainability issues. it's going to be a long haul. it's not going to happen overnight, basically because the government b
was in it. >> very difficult. >> the debt ceiling is still around. >> easily, though. >> the debt ceiling is still around. you are still dealing with that and, of course, the sequester issue. there are a lot of questions about what happens. we're speccing to run into that debt ceiling sometime between february 15th and march 1st. in the meantime, let's talk about corporate news. aig is suiciding maiden lane over lawsuit rights. it's the federal vehicle created during aig's bailout. at issue is whether the insurer transferred its rights to sue for losses that it incurred on its troubled bonds when it sold $2 billion in securities to the fed in 20308. aig is preserving its right to sue the federal government and other debts. >> fed chairman ben bernanke is going to speak and answer questions at the university of michigan. in d.c., president obama is said to be forging ahead on a wide ranging plan to overhaul the immigration plan this year. this includes a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants already in the country. immigrants would have to pay fines and back taxes. it would require bu
center on a talk to talk about options of dealing with the debt ceiling check out c-span studentcam 2013 video documentary competition. the deadline is friday january 28. the grand prize is $5000. >> i welcome all of you here today. on behalf of the gerald ford school of public policy, university of michigan is honored to welcome the honorable ben bernanke, chairman of the board of governors. today's conversation is in a series of distinguished lectures at the school. we are pleased to produce today's events and to have have president mary sue coleman with us. i would like to welcome all of them and thank them for joining us today. it is an honor and truly a personal pleasure for me to introduce our special guest. the charge is to promote a healthy economy and a complex and critically important mission. german ben bernanke was first appointed as the chair in 2006 and he has served in that role during the most challenging time for monetary and financial policy since the great depression. the financial crisis, the great recession, slow recovery with the evolving global challenges and very
deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceiling. and doesn't that suggest that we are going to go into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about how to resolve this? >> well, no, major, i think if you look at the history, getting votes for the debt ceiling is always difficult, and budgets in this town are always difficult. i went through this just last year. but what's different is we never saw a situation as we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. and the fact of the matter is, is that we have never seen the debt ceiling used in this fashion, where the notion
because of scheduling and needing to deal with the debt ceiling and the looming sequester and house republicans concerned that if they do anything on tax reform, that they may leave themselves open to the senate not taking action. therefore, they have taken in on popular vote for no reason. >> first of all we have to solve this debt crisis in terms of sequestration and in terms of the full faith and credit of the u.s. and. we are not going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that cannot basically be moved for what we need to do in the next six weeks. so that would leave adequate time to tackle the longer-range problems. we will not publish tax reform in the next six weeks, but we need to essentially deal with the sequester. since we find a balanced approach that is going to raise the trillion dollar surplus to it. that is why i have some optimism. because we need to face up to the next six weeks and solve it and then move on. >> [inaudible question] i'd like to ask you about one of the big things involving entitlement reform. how big of a package wo
, between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, we may very well be able to meet the goal we set out to do, which is to have roughly $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and put us on that past. i didn't come here to talk about any of this important subjects today because as important as they all are today we have a mortgage and indie media call and that is how to do with the epidemic of gun violence in america. the one of the statistics better than anyone, so i'm not going to repeat it. on that score i might add ale in a credible threat of gratitude to many of you at the table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity and this ballroom, nor do we have any ballroom, but we all know, it wanted knowledges we have to do some gain. we have to act and i hope we all agree there's a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in your newton cannot be tolerated. that tragedy in public life has affected the public safety in a way that i've never seen before.
to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where government doesn't pay its bills. >> a number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in a deal, it certainly went part way, but leaves a number of issues still on the table. would you care to raise that as an additional fiscal cliff that is facing us? would you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raise that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff, if it is allowed to take place, it probably would have traded a recession this year. a good bit of that has been addressed. nevertheless, we still have fairly restrictive fiscal policies now. it is estimated that federal fiscal policy will we have quite a bit to do to address the their long-term sustainability issues. there's a lot more work to do. let me be very clear about that. it's going to be a long haul and it's not going to happen overnigh3 it's going to be a long haul and it's not going to happen overnight. we because the government budget represents the values and priorities of the public and the decision
, but it is very important that congress take necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government does not pay its bills. >> and number of people have expressed concern about how much of the chill news were addressed in the deal. it went part way, but it leaves a number of issues still on the table and negotiations are looming. would you characterize that as an additional cliff that is facing us? or is it not as concerned as it was when you raised that term initially? >> as i said, the fiscal kloof, if allowed -- the fiscal clef, if allowed to take place, would probably create a recession this year. a good part of that has been addressed. but nevertheless, we have a set of a restrictive fiscal policies now. federal fiscal policy will subtract from real gdp growth something on the order of one% to 1.5% this year. it is quite a drag on the economy. there is more work to do. let me be clear about that. it will be a long haul. it will not happen overnight. basically because the government budget represents the values and priorities of the public and decisions being made
ceiling bill that was undermined from the beginning, no deal was reached, sequestration, massive cuts to our national security, our national defense. would be inflicted. and massive cuts to medicare. our leaders responded to me that , gee, the democrats will never allow the cuts to medicare, the sequestration to medicare, $300 billion or so, they'll never allow that. that's why we know the supercommittee will reach an agreement. i advised them that that would not happen. there would be no agreement. of course they're willing to have $300 billion or so cut to medicare because obamacare cut $00 billion from medicare, from our seniors' care, without a single republican vote. so the only way the democrats could run a commercial last year, 2012 with any sincerity at all saying, gee, republicans are cutting medicare, would be if they prevent republicans from reaching agreement with the president, democrats, and then they'll run in in commercials in 2012 and blame republicans and say, see, they didn't reach an agreement. they wanted to cut seniors and help their rich friends. as some of us m
against raising the debt ceiling which tends to be popular. people -- you know, the american public, they hear debt ceiling and they think no, let's not do that. that sounds awful to give government more money to spend. he's trying to turn it around. but it absolutely is a dynamic that he exemplploited when he w senator. >> robert costa, let's look at this for a minute. republicans have a tricky situation. because the country does not want us to default. and this whole business of managing accounts and prioritizing, there's 80 million payment accounts. i know the interest on the debt will be paid, but to some extent the gop has got to watch itself, robert. they could come really at the wrong end of a massive public relations blunder. >> that's exactly right, larry. the president's press conference today really was first battle in this public relations war. what matters is that the president is out there for an hour, making his case to the american people. what the republicans need to do a better job is making their case. now, it's easy to point fingers on capitol hill and say, well,
, in march, government spending does run out. they would focus on a longer-term debt ceiling increase sometime in april or may. that is the strategy from house republicans. president obama says he has not even entertained any type of negotiations. republicans should agree to raise the debt ceiling because having to raise it is the result of appropriations already passed and signed into law. back to you. melissa: thanks so much. ashley: here with reaction to the gop when it peter welch. thank you for joining us. you say, look, republicans are making it an "economic weapon of mass distraction." do they get is a continuation of that? >> it is actually progress for the republican confidence, but it is not progress for the country. that tack tick is not one that they can hold onto because they know it will plunge this country into a deeper recession. they have been -- it is a way to say they are avoiding. ashley: it really is not addressing the issue, though, what will it take to get that in place. i know that you, of course, have been leading the charge to have the president to prevent th
the negotiations should take place? should be the debt ceiling or the continuing resolution to fund the government or sequestration? caller: the continuing revolution to keep the government going -- resolution. there are many departments we don't need. i was showing my grandchildr the debt clock, telling him how much money he would know when he becomes a taxpayer. he said he does not want to become a taxpayer. this is taxation without representation. they have to get this under control. they need a dyiet. host: jason is a democratic caller in brooklyn, new york. caller: i think the debt is negotiable. it has been high before. host: what did you say? caller: it ought to be negotiable. i think obama needs to the finish his job. spending programs for poor neighborhoods and give other people a chance in this country. the tea party and right-wing republicans, it is obvious they are racist and nobody wants to work with them. in the next four years they have to get it right, because asians, hispanics, and african-americans make up the majority of this country now. so they had better get it right. host: t
time brough so it's very important that congress take the necessary action to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. estimate the number of people have expressed concern about how much of the challenges actually were addressed in the deal. as you mentioned is certainly went part way that leaves a number of issues still on the table and additional negotiations are learning to read what you characterize that as a class that is facing us or do you think that it's not as concerning as it was when you raised that term initially? >> as i said the fiscal cliff would have probably created a recession this year. a good bit of that has been addressed but nevertheless, we still have a fairly restrictive set of fiscal policies now. it's estimated that federal fiscal policy will support from the real gdp growth on the order of one to 1.5% this year, a drag on the economy and at the same time we have quite a bit to do with addressing our long-term sustainable the issues so it's a lot more work to do. let me be clear about that. but it's going to be
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)